How the LGBTQ Community Taught America to Have More Compassion

September 27, 2017

When the AIDS pandemic hit in 1981, the LGBTQ community was turned upside down. American actress Judith Light recalls the horrifying wave of death that swept through the community—but from that devastation, she witnessed a new force emerge. Pushed to be self-reliant in the absence of outside help, the LGBTQ community banded together and "became this magnificent example to the world of how to be of service," Light says. Elizabeth Taylor appealed to Congress for funding to fight the AIDS crisis, Larry Kramer founded the direct action advocacy group ACT UP to bring about legislation and medical research, and artists told the powerful stories of themselves and the ones they loved to help people understand why compassion was warranted. "I began to see that we were, by the example of the LGBQ community, we were one human family," says Light. Since then the LGBTQ community has not stopped being a force for progress and compassion, but there is much further to go, she says. Trans people are currently on the frontline of a struggle for public compassion and acceptance, and Light—who stars in Amazon’s comedy-drama series Transparent—naturally has much to say about defeating bigotry, serving the community, and the immense courage of the trans people who come out to live authentically.