Jason Kottke
Founder, Kottke.org; Fmr. Web Designer
01:31

Internet Advertising

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Internet advertising presents many opportunities for trial and error, Kottke says.

Jason Kottke

Jason Kottke is a blogger and former web designer. Educated at Coe College, Kottke began his career as a web designer in 1986. He worked on design projects for companies as diverse as Charles Schwab, Target, and the University of Minnesota. He designed the now-ubiquitous typeface Silkscreen in 1999, which has since been adopted by Adobe, MTV and Volvo. He has served on the Advisory Board for SXSW Interactive since 2000. In 2005, he announced he had left his web design job to work on his blog full-time. The site is now supported by paid advertisements. Kottke lives in New York City.

Transcript

 

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Question: What advice do you have for Web entrepreneurs?

 

Jason Kottke: The thing about online advertising is it’s so . . .  It’s just . . . it just sort of works.  I mean I run ads on my web site, and I never have to think about it.  I . . . the ad is just sitting there, and you know I get a check every month, and I just don’t have to think about it.  I also did this thing where I solicited contributions from my readers, and I did that for a year – sort of a PBS fund drive sort of thing.  And that was quite a bit harder for me because there was a lot more work involved.  And you know and I think people on the Web are used to getting things, if not for free, then for cheap.  And you know asking people to pay sort of a $30 subscription where they’re not really getting anything more than what they had is kind of a . . .  I don’t know.  It was a difficult thing to . . . to try and get across.  But at the same time I guess I’m glad I tried it.  And you know I guess the advice I would offer is . . . is you know don’t . . .  I don’t know.  Just don’t be afraid to try . . . try different stuff . . . you know try and fail.  It’s really not such a bad thing.

 

Recorded on: 10/9/07

 


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