Richard Meier
Architect
01:12

How is globalization changing architecture?

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An international market makes new discoveries possible.

Richard Meier

Richard Meier is one of the foremost contemporary American architects. In 1984 at the age of 49, Meier was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize, often referred to as the Nobel of architecture. He was the youngest architect to receive the profession's highest accolade. Meier is known for resisting trend-based designs, instead developing his own design philosophy rooted in rationalism and noted for its use of the color white. His designs can be seen as Neo-Corbusian, referencing the famous French architect's early phase in particular. Meier has also named Frank Lloyd Wright as another major influence. Perhaps his most famous design is The Getty Center, a Los Angeles art museum funded by the J. Paul Getty trust. Meier was born in Newark, New Jersey, and educated at Cornell University.

Transcript

Question: How is globalization changing architecture?

Richard Meier: Well architecture, as I said, through communication, through publication, through Internet, through web sites, is communicated, and is part of the globalization of . . . of what’s taking place in the world today. I saw the work of a young architect in Argentina – extraordinary work. Really amazing. Terrific. And I was just thrilled because . . . just to find it, to know about it. I don’t know this person, but I really respect this person’s work. And I think that kind of discovery and that kind of information perhaps wasn’t possible 10 or 15 years ago.

 

Recorded on: 9/17/07


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