What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

Watch videos

World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

Go to blogs

Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

Find out more
Close
With rendition switcher

Transcript

Question: What is the joy in what you do?

Lidia Bastianich: There’s a tremendous joy in what I do because it is a gift of giving. And it’s a gift of giving almost of yourself or your talent. But I think that any talented individual – be it a composer, be it a painter – they are giving of themselves to touch other people. And when the other people are touched, this is the most tremendous reward that you can get; that you’ve made a difference, even a small difference; that you’ve contributed to somebody’s existence – the well existence. That gives you the great reward that I sense in cooking.

Question: What is the struggle in what you do?

Lidia Bastianich: The challenge is, I think, really dealing in today’s world with the products that have been manipulated.  And products that are taken in its pure form from nature and belabored into something that is invented . . . that is by marketing deemed necessary that really is not.  So as a chef, when I get these products I am very upset.  It confuses me.  I need straight products from nature.

Question: How do you cultivate the joy of cooking in someone else?

Lidia Bastianich: The joy of cooking certainly can be acquired at any age, I think.  Because your palate does not steer you wrong.  It does not lie to you. Something looks good, it really is good.  And it’s sort of . . . It’s beyond almost . . . You can’t block it personally.  It just goes directly.  So therefore I think that exposure to that is absolutely necessary.  As parents, in cultivating that, it begins at the . . . as early as you can at an early age.  And that is having the aromas around children as they grow up.  Cooking around them so that in the house, that happens, and the children get used to the smell.  They become friendly with the smell of broccoli.  They become friendly with the smell of cabbage.  And when they begin to . . . or the mother puts it in front of them at the age of four, five, six, it’s not a complete stranger.  So this familiarization with food needs to happen immediately as one is born, not . . .  There is a lot of alienation.  Everything is packaged.  Everything is sealed.  You don’t smell anything.  You buy pre-cooked food.  It’s tough.  It’s tough out there.

Question: How do you teach someone to cook?

Lidia Bastianich:  I think just to relax and have confidence in themselves.  I think that everybody can cook on a certain level.  You don’t have to be a master chef; but I think it’s part of our survival mode, the nourishment mode.  So I will just say relax, be mentored.  Certainly try to learn things from . . . whether it’s your mother, your grandmother, whatever; from books, from television.  And just attempt it.

 

Recorded on: 10/4/07

 

 

 

 

How do you teach someone to...

Newsletter: Share: