George Kohlrieser on Changing Mindsets

George Kohlrieser is an organizational and clinical psychologist, a professor of Leadership and Organizational Behaviour at The International Institute for Management Development (IMD), and consultant to global organizations around the world.

His research, teaching, and consulting activities are focused on high performance leadership, high performance teamwork, conflict management, change management, dialogue and negotiation, coaching, stress management, work life balance, and personal and professional development. He is also a Police Psychologist and Hostage Negotiator focusing on aggression management and hostage negotiations. Kohlrieser is founder and director of Shiloah International, a consultancy offering integrated programs to a wide range of organizations. He has worked in some eighty-five countries in North and South America, Eastern and Western Europe, Middle East, Asia, India, Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Kohlrieser completed his doctorate at Ohio State University where he wrote his dissertation on cardio vascular recovery of law enforcement leaders following high stress situations. He is also the author of a recent book entitled Hostage At The Table: How Leaders Can Overcome Conflict, Influence Others, and Raise Performance.

  • Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

Kohlrieser: The power of influencing and leading and changing mindsets, which fundamentally leaders have to do, it’s through questions, asking what is inside, getting through questions a change of mindset. So when you had arrogance, you had this closed minded attitude, you see then it takes more time, it takes more patience to try to work with those people to come through. The other is where you have territoriality, people who do not know how to form bonds. The research shows about 20% of the population do not know how to create human bonding. Mostly male and many of them are in top positions in organizations. They have never learned how to create human bonds. They’re goal focused, they’re number focused, they’re driven by competition, territoriality, but not by the human element. And you look at Jim Collins’ book on “Good to Great,” you’ll see that all of those leaders, number 1, went through personal losses or professional losses. They recovered from them, rebonded, but they were focused on the bonding process. 5th level leadership, as he talks about, is fundamentally being able to putting others before yourself, and that, When you see this selfishness, you see this narcissism, you see this tendency to not be able to create social bonding, that’s where I know we got to challenge.

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