Can old media survive the digital revolution?

David Pogue is the personal-technology columnist for The New York Times. Each week, he contributes a print column, an e-mail column and an online video. In addition, he writes Pogue's Posts, one of The Times's most popular blogs.  David is also an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News, a frequent guest on NPR's "Morning Edition," and a regular on CNBC.

With over three million books in print, David is one of the world's best-selling how-to authors. He is the author or co-author of seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own line of complete, funny computer books, the Missing Manual series, which now includes 60 titles.

David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in music, and he spent 10 years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals.

He's been profiled on both "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes." In 2007, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in music from the Shenandoah Conservatory.

  • Transcript

TRANSCRIPT

Question: Can old media survive the digital revolution?

David Pogue: That’s a tricky question. They are surviving it. The smart ones are, as you know, going online. And recently InfoWorld, I believe it was, completely dropped their print edition and they’ve moved online and they’re actually more profitable than they ever were. The New York Times is certainly hedging its bets, much more online, much more digital.

Newspapers is the one that I would specifically worry about. I don’t think the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal will ever go away, but I think some of the little guys probably will. They’ll have to move online or disappear entirely.

Question: What will the New York Times look like in five years?

David Pogue:  Well, the paper size actually shrank. The Wall Street Journal and the New York Times both went down by an inch in each direction. Five years from now, it’ll be like oh, the Sunday Times, whoosh, you know? So nobody can predict the future of technology, but if you extrapolate from the trends, more online stuff, less reliance on the printed edition.

Recorded on: May 15, 2008.


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