Anne-Marie Slaughter
Director of Policy Planning, U.S. Dept of State; Professor, Princeton University
01:08

Anne-Marie Slaughter on the International Criminal Court

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Anne-Marie Slaughter explains how Obama has a key opportunity to reform the court.

Anne-Marie Slaughter

Anne-Marie Slaughter, is the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. She is presently on leave, serving as Director of Policy Planning for the United States Department of State. She was Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University from 2002-2009.

Slaughter came to the Wilson School from Harvard Law School where she was the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law and Director of the International Legal Studies Program. She is also the former President of the American Society of International Law, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served on the board of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Drawing from this rich interdisciplinary expertise, Slaughter has written and taught broadly on global governance, international criminal law, and American foreign policy. Her most recent book is The Idea that Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World, published in 2007 by Basic Books. She is also the author of A New World Order, in which she identified transnational networks of government officials as an increasingly important component of global governance. Slaughter has been a frequent commentator on foreign affairs in newspapers, radio, and television. She was also the convener and academic co-chair of the Princeton Project on National Security, a multi-year research project aimed at developing a new, bipartisan national security strategy for the United States, and was a member of the National War Powers Commission.

Transcript

Slaughter:    The International Criminal Court is a huge opportunity for the Obama administration, although if I were advising the new President Obama, I would tell him don’t touch it for at least a year.  You’ve got enough on your plate.  Don’t make this like gays in the military where it’s something very controversial and you get out there on it early, but actually it poisons the well for a lot of other things.  But the reason I say it’s a great opportunity is because what has been lacking above all on the International Criminal Court is just plain leadership.  There has never been a presidential address on what the court is and what it could do.  President Clinton ultimately supported the court at the very end of his administration.  There was a period around 1995 where he supported it, but as the court was actually being created, he had lots of other things to occupy his time.  He was not in good shape with the military. 


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