Anne-Marie Slaughter on the Future of International Organizations

Anne-Marie Slaughter, is the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. She is presently on leave, serving as Director of Policy Planning for the United States Department of State. She was Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University from 2002-2009.

Slaughter came to the Wilson School from Harvard Law School where she was the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law and Director of the International Legal Studies Program. She is also the former President of the American Society of International Law, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served on the board of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Drawing from this rich interdisciplinary expertise, Slaughter has written and taught broadly on global governance, international criminal law, and American foreign policy. Her most recent book is The Idea that Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World, published in 2007 by Basic Books. She is also the author of A New World Order, in which she identified transnational networks of government officials as an increasingly important component of global governance. Slaughter has been a frequent commentator on foreign affairs in newspapers, radio, and television. She was also the convener and academic co-chair of the Princeton Project on National Security, a multi-year research project aimed at developing a new, bipartisan national security strategy for the United States, and was a member of the National War Powers Commission.

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TRANSCRIPT

Slaughter: So, there’s also a whole set of informal institutions that have grown up over the past 30 years really as a function of globalization itself that are networks of national government officials, [with the] Central Bankers have been talking to each other for 30, 40 years.  Securities Commissioners, insurance supervisors, any trust officials, environmental officials, even judges and to some extent legislators are talking to their counterparts abroad.  So, instead of some vast international bureaucracy, what you’ve got are these networks of national government officials who are talking to each other just like corporate officials are, or if you’re in a non-governmental organization, you know all your counterparts around the world.  And those institutions are, they exist, they have been meeting for many years, but we’re not using them in any productive way.  We’re not recognizing the existence of a global financial network and saying, now, wait a minute, let’s connect that to the IMF.  Let’s connect that to the G7, G8 or the G20 and let’s have some formal institutions that are more representative of the world, but let’s hook them on to these informal institutions that can move quickly, that have access to the people on the ground and every nation in the world and let’s figure out how to use those networks so that they’re not just talking to each other, they’re actually coordinating policy and implementing new ideas.


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