David Pogue
Technology Columnist, The New York Times
02:15

American Education and Technological Innovation

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David Pogue

David Pogue is the personal-technology columnist for The New York Times. Each week, he contributes a print column, an e-mail column and an online video. In addition, he writes Pogue's Posts, one of The Times's most popular blogs.  David is also an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News, a frequent guest on NPR's "Morning Edition," and a regular on CNBC.

With over three million books in print, David is one of the world's best-selling how-to authors. He is the author or co-author of seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own line of complete, funny computer books, the Missing Manual series, which now includes 60 titles.

David graduated summa cum laude from Yale in 1985, with distinction in music, and he spent 10 years conducting and arranging Broadway musicals.

He's been profiled on both "48 Hours" and "60 Minutes." In 2007, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in music from the Shenandoah Conservatory.

Transcript

David Pogue: It’s a bigger problem than I know what to say. Obviously it’s a priority issue. I don’t know how you translate that. Is it something on the parenting level? Is it something to do with funding? Is it set from the very top? Is it a Presidential thing? I don’t really know.

There’s a lot of smart people working on the problem, but all I know is that the problem exists and it distresses me personally.

I do not come across a lot of tech-savvy women. Year after year after year, it’s the same thing. The PR people are women, and if I have a question they’ll pass me along to the male engineers who can answer the question. I don’t know if there’s a built-in bias in the system, or if there might just be an inclination. I know this will generate tons of letters but, you know, it may be that fewer women are interested. I don’t know.

At one point, I wrote in a column [for the New York Times] the fact that older people generally have a harder time adapting to new technologies than younger people, which I think was as safe a generalization as one could possibly make. But of course I heard from all these old people, like, “How dare you? You know, I can use a Blackberry with the best of ‘em.” But it’s a generalization. It doesn’t mean that every single person is in that category. Yes, I know that.

But I know as a 45-year-old it’s harder for me to pick up new things than when I was 20. Again, I’ve been a computer tutor my entire life and I can see it in the ages of people that I teach. So I still believe that’s true. So politically uncorrect [sic] as it may be, it may be true that there are differences between older people and younger people, and between men and women.

Recorded on: May 15, 2008.


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