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We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

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Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

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Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

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Thinking Beyond Sheryl Sandberg's "Lean In"

July 3, 2014, 12:00 AM
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The “Lean In” movement that Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg founded with her book of the same name continued a conversation psychologist Matina Horner started 46 years ago. In Horner’s famous study, “Fear of Success," she found that women were afraid of success complicating their lives and experienced anxiety over asserting themselves. But this continues to be only part of the issue of why we don’t have more women CEOs and presidents.

“I think the real problem is the way institutions are structured and the paths to leadership today which require one kind of person to be successful,” says Jody Greenstone Miller, the founder and CEO of Business Talent Group. “That kind of person is the kind of person who makes the judgment that working, and working at very intense ways that require sacrifices across many other elements of an individual’s life, is the way you will achieve success, and they’re willing to make that choice.”

There’s nothing, of course, wrong with choosing this path. But as Miller points out, most people who make this decision tend to be women.

“If we really want to tackle why there aren’t more women in leadership,” says Miller, “[or] what I call a diversity of leadership that really is about a diversity of values, not just diversity of gender or race, you need to create alternative paths to leadership.”

For Miller’s insights into how to build a culture that allows for greater diversity in leadership, and more balanced lives for the executives and their teams, watch this clip from Big Think’s interview:

 

Thinking Beyond Sheryl Sand...

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