March 29

Power and Influence

Friday’s Big Idea

Work-Life Balance

Sustaining a work-life balance in an unsustainable world of work is a tricky challenge. So who's responsibility is it? As Ellen Galinsky points out in today's lesson, the responsibility is best described as an "iron triangle," which represents the interest of the employee, the boss and the employee's greater social sphere.

To the extent that a successful work-life balance can be maintained, it requires contributions from all of these stakeholders. In other words, it truly takes a village to maintain a healthy work-life balance. 

  1. 1 How Far Do Women Have to Lean In?
  2. 2 Why "Having it All" Is Not Just A...
  3. 3 What Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Ge...
  4. 4 Gender, Education, and the Gender...
   
  1. How Far Do Women Have to Lean In?

    How Far Do Women Have to Lean In?

    How much of women's problems are problems because women are not leaning in, and how much of the responsibility is up to the employer to create the environment that women need or men need to succeed at work?

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  2. Why "Having it All" Is Not Just About Having it All

    Why "Having it All" Is Not Just About Having it All

    What happens when you do make it to the top of your field, only to find that it’s not exactly what you’d expected or been told to expect?

    Read More…
  3. What Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Gets Right…

    What Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Gets Right…

    One of Sandberg’s important points, in my opinion, is that women should cross the bridge of work-family conflict when they get to it.

    Read More…
  4. Gender, Education, and the Gender Gap: Blame It On the Kids?

    Gender, Education, and the Gender Gap: Blame It On the Kids?

    A recent study shows that the decision to have children, and especially to have them early, is a factor that contributes to women's educational attainment. 

    Read More…