February 9

21st Century Living

Saturday’s Big Idea

Permanent Beta

The psychologist Madeline Levine has seen the effects of "tiger parenting" or "hyper-parenting," and it's not a pretty picture. Due to the enormous pressure to succeed, children are behaving destructively. 

Levine argues for a different approach that she calls "courageous parenting." If your child hasn't learned to read in kindergarten, don't freak out. You need to embrace the process of learning and developing skills, not just the outcome. In doing so, you will arrive at a different definition of success. Instead of overvaluing the obvious and relatively unimportant life skills that can be measured, courageous parenting focuses instead on cultivating what is really important, yet harder to measure.

This concept, of course, can and should be applied to any adult learner as well. 

  1. 1 The Kids Are Not Alright. Stop Me...
  2. 2 Teach Your Child Self-Discipline ...
  3. 3 How to Bring Up Bébé, Not a Brat
  4. 4 How to Improve Children's Social ...
   
  1. The Kids Are Not Alright. Stop Measuring Them All the Time.

    The Kids Are Not Alright. Stop Measuring Them All the Time.

    Psychologist Madeline Levine offers savvy advice for courageous parenting at different stages of a child's education.  

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  2. Teach Your Child Self-Discipline Without Tiger-Parenting Her To Death

    Teach Your Child Self-Discipline Without Tiger-Parenting Her To Death

    The importance of teaching children self-discipline and the educational power of fun – are also unusually well-supported by science.

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  3. How to Bring Up Bébé, Not a Brat

    How to Bring Up Bébé, Not a Brat

    Former Wall Street Journal reporter Pamela Druckerman moved to France in 2003 and discovered that French children were much better behaved than American kids. Here's what she brought back with her. 

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  4. How to Improve Children's Social Skills

    How to Improve Children's Social Skills

    The basics of social behavior come from the brain’s emotional system, which is an important contributor to empathy and morality from infancy through adulthood. Babies often cry when they hear another baby crying, because knowing that another person is unhappy makes them feel bad.

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