January 27

Going Mental

Sunday’s Big Idea

Hedonic Adaptation

When you enter a romantic relationship, or get married, or have a kid, you are jumping onto the so-called "hedonic treadmill." An initial period of bliss will subside and you will eventually return to a relatively stable level of happiness. Happiness is a treadmill in the sense that you need to keep working at it.

In today's lesson, Sonja Lyubomirsky dispatches some of the most common myths about happiness, namely that certain life-changing events will lead us directly to happiness, or conversely, to a state of being unhappy. As Lyubomirsky points out, this reductive understanding of happiness represents a false promise. After all, you can be unhappily married or happily divorced. It all depends on how you manage expectations and train your brain to take the best advantage of your circumstances. 

 

  1. 1 Happiness Favors the Prepared Mind
  2. 2 Why Does New Love Fade so Fast?
  3. 3 The Duality of Happiness
  4. 4 Daniel Kahneman: Why Moving to Ca...
   
  1. Happiness Favors the Prepared Mind

    Happiness Favors the Prepared Mind

    There are plenty of people who are single and frustrated, unhappily married, or, on the other hand, happily divorced. What matters most is how they prepare their minds. 

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  2. Why Does New Love Fade so Fast?

    Why Does New Love Fade so Fast?

    Research shows that the exciting emotional bonds created by marriage begin to fade after just two years, but that introducing variety into the relationship has restorative effects. 

    Read More…
  3. The Duality of Happiness

    The Duality of Happiness

    Happiness requires more than extended periods of pleasure.

    Read More…
  4. Daniel Kahneman: Why Moving to California Won’t Make You Happy

    Daniel Kahneman: Why Moving to California Won’t Make You Happy

    In some crucial areas of human cognition, we don’t know and we can’t fully trust ourselves. On the bright side, Daniel Kahneman’s work shows that the kinds of errors we tend to make are extremely predictable.   

    Read More…