December 19

Going Mental

Wednesday’s Big Idea

Today's Big Idea: The Science of Creativity

Given that the relationship between the science of creativity and the media will continue to evolve, it will be interesting to see how the media’s portrayal of creativity affects the research.

Starting with Gladwell’s Blink or Levitt and Dubner’s Freakonomics, the public began to expect counter-intuitive results from cognitive science. Now we live in an era where readers of science books on human nature expect clever psychological studies to explain every nook and cranny of our complex nature.

Sam McNerney argues this trend is good because it gets otherwise uninterested lay readers excited about cognitive science. However, the popularity of these books may create a bad system of incentives for researchers, in which researchers are motivated to publish results just to create a stir at the expense of sound research techniques and less provocative but more important research. 

  1. 1 The Science of Creativity in 2013...
  2. 2 Creatures of Habit
  3. 3 Slow Down, You Think Too Fast
  4. 4 How to See the World Like Malcolm...
   
  1. The Science of Creativity in 2013: Looking Back to Look Forward

    The Science of Creativity in 2013: Looking Back to Look Forward

    The neuroscience of creativity is flourishing. But will the popularity of this subject lead to better, or sloppier science?

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  2. Creatures of Habit

    Creatures of Habit

    Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit, describes the powerful neurological 'habit loops' that underlie much of what people, corporations, and societies do.

    Read More…
  3. Slow Down, You Think Too Fast

    Slow Down, You Think Too Fast

    Confidence is a mark of intuitive thinking regardless of whether intuitive thinking is expert intuitive thinking or heuristic intuitive thinking.

    Read More…
  4. How to See the World Like Malcolm Gladwell

    How to See the World Like Malcolm Gladwell

    When you look beneath the surface of the everyday, you realize how radically different and unexpected other people’s experiences are from your own.

    Read More…