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Why Your Company Should Consider a University Partnership

Attracting high-end talent is important for any company, but problems arise when courting experienced workers who are expensive and may have qualms about moving to where your business is located. That's why teaming up with a university is such a great idea. It allows a business's leadership to invest locally and aid the development of promising future employees.

John Hall, CEO of Influence & Co., recently penned a piece for Forbes about the benefits of such a partnership:

"For my company, developing a relationship with the University of Missouri made perfect sense. It has one of the best journalism schools in the country and makes an effort to instill an entrepreneurial mindset in its students. Professors are looking for real-world opportunities for their students, and offering that experience through our internship program gives us access to top journalism students. All it took was contacting a few professors, speaking in classes, and finding ways we could provide value to the university."

Just as a baseball team prefers to develop young talent from within rather than bank on the free agent market, businesses should seek out ways to scout potential employees. Hall explains that a university partnership gives your company access to a pool of ambitious and enthusiastic young people eager for real-world experience. It also means you're able to attract the best and brightest before they enter the competitive job market. 

Despite the bountiful benefits, Hall stresses that the partnership he developed with University of Missouri is a two-way street.

"When you develop a close relationship with professors, you’re helping them out, as well. Instead of relying on textbook material, professors can call on you to offer real-world examples in class and provide students with hands-on learning...

Our company is constantly communicating with the university to find new ways to work together. Professors are thrilled that their students get a chance to tackle real client work instead of making copies or getting coffee."

Keep reading at Forbes

Photo credit: Ollyy / Shutterstock

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