What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

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Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

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World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

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Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

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Twitterature

December 16, 2009, 5:53 AM
It was only a matter of time before internet users used their “collective energy” to make a collaborative work of literature, writes The Independent. “The World According to Twitter: Crowd-sourced Wit and Wisdom from David Pogue (and His 350,000 Followers) is the work of The New York Times technology writer Pogue, who asked his Twitter followers questions ranging from ‘What's your greatest regret?’ to ‘What's the best bumper sticker you've seen lately?’, then collected the best of their responses and published 2,524 of them in book form. ‘Compose the subject line of an email message you really, really don't want to read,’ goes the first request. The responses include ‘To my former sexual partners, as required by law’ and ‘Your Dad is now following you on Twitter’. To the prompt ‘Add 1 letter to a famous person's name; explain’, witty users replied with ‘Malcolm XY: Civil rights activist, definitively male’, and ‘Sean Penne: Starchy, overcooked actor/activist’. Since the book went to press, Pogue's follower count has leapt to more than 1.2 million, making its subtitle slightly less accurate than Wikipedia.”
 

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