Over at Forbes, Susan Adams has a nice piece up about quitting with class:

"Now that hiring has picked up, an increasing number of workers are moving on to greener pastures. Career coaches and human resource pros agree it’s always best to leave the best possible impression when you exit a job, no matter the circumstances."

Beyond the simple axiomatic, "Hey, come on, there's no need for that," it's good to remember that word travels swiftly in our ultra-fancy 21st century world. Professional networks through Facebook and LinkedIn make it possible for news of an ugly Exodus to reach unexpected ears. Someone at the company you're hoping to join could find out. Perhaps one of your colleagues who sees you throw a fit could end up being a potential boss in the future, or an influencer of the person tasked with hiring new employees. No matter how insular your work situation feels, remember that your actions do not exist within a vacuum.

Reputations are a big deal in today's professional world; all you have to do is look at all the people who have scuttled theirs via social media. Control your urges. Everyone imagines the perfect quitting scenario. Everyone has scribed in their mind the ideal script for dressing down an evil supervisor. Even if you hate your boss and want your quitting to be a ritual act of vehement disgust, you've got to see the forest for the trees. Your workplace is but one branch within a professional arboretum. It's so much better for your career (and really, your personal wellness) to put aside bitterness and conduct yourself with class. Be the bigger person and your life will be better because of it.

Read more at Forbes.

On the other side of the coin, Big Think expert Barbara Corcoran shares the secrets of hiring in the following interview:

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