What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

Watch videos

World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

Go to blogs

Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

Find out more
Close

How to Guide Angry Boys Through their Volatile Teenage Years

July 26, 2014, 12:00 PM
00moodyteen

What's the Latest?

Depending on what version of Spiderman you deem gospel, Peter Parker was a teenager when his Uncle Ben bestowed upon him the sage-like advice "with great power comes great responsibility." Similar aphorisms can be traced to FDR, Voltaire, and (speaking of gospels) the Book of Luke. Psychologist Steven Stosny adds "privilege" to the power/responsibility equation, arguing in this column at Psychology Today the importance of teaching teenage boys the direct relationship between the three.

What's the Big Idea?

According to Stosny, the anger that uniquely afflicts teenage boys puts them at risk of dangerous outbursts and irresponsible behavior. These are caused by judgement-clouding bursts of rage-inducing hormones. The best ways for teenage boys to deal with these tempestuous urges is through structure provided by compassionate, goal-driven parents. Lessons that Stosny insists must be passed on include:

  • Inclusion in a family/community requires emotional investment
  • Respect for property of others
  • The importance of money management
  • Irresponsible behavior has consequences
  • You must own your mistakes and not blame others
  • The direct relationship between responsibility, privilege, and power
  •  

    Also vital is the way these lessons are conveyed. Stosny explains how teenage boys are modelers more than listeners and will emulate the actions of their parents. Even when trying to verbally relay lessons, there are important strategies adults must take to get through to teens who want nothing more than for their parents to shut up and go away. The best ways to communicate with a teen involve eye contact, touching, and short sentences that do not resemble lectures.

    If you're having trouble getting through to a teenage boy in your life, I suggest reading the article (linked again below) and telling us what you think about life lessons, communication, and avuncular advice from comic book characters.

    Keep reading at Psychology Today

    Photo credit: Accord / Shutterstock

     

    How to Guide Angry Boys Thr...

    Newsletter: Share: