What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

Watch videos

World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

Go to blogs

Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

Find out more
Close

Honda Wants To Save The Humble Drive-In

August 13, 2013, 6:39 PM
Shutterstock_94255000

What's the Latest Development?

Last week, in an attempt to draw awareness to a part of American culture that's slowly disappearing, Honda launched a Web site that invites visitors to vote on which five of America's remaining drive-in theaters will receive free digital projectors. In addition, the site encourages people to spread the word through social media, and includes a link that accepts donations to the automaker's Project Drive-In Fund.

What's the Big Idea?

At their peak, shortly after World War II, more than 4,000 drive-ins dotted the American landscape, representing 25 percent of all movie screens. Because the motion picture industry is expected to stop distributing 35-millimeter versions of its films at the end of this year, the drive-ins that are left will have to convert to digital projection if they want to stay in business. Unfortunately, such systems can cost upwards of $75,000, which is out of reach for owners of some smaller theaters. Honda executive Alicia Jones says that the company is committed to helping save as many as it can: "Cars and drive-in theaters go hand-in-hand, and it's our mission to save this decades-old slice of Americana that holds such nostalgia for so many of us."

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

Read it at Ad Age

 

 

Honda Wants To Save The Hum...

Newsletter: Share: