Article written by guest writer Rin Mitchell

What’s the Latest Development?

It is noted that there were three discrete periods in the history of anti-semitism that would make sense if it was compiled into one big framework: “ancient anti-semitism, which was cultural and political; Christian anti-semitism, around since the beginning of anti-semitism, which was religious and which established many of the patterns of anti-Judaism, and modern anti-semitism, which was racial.” Many authors retell the stories, but leave out the most important details, as one author did when they discussed what led to the first anti-Jewish riots in first century Alexandria, but neglected to mention that the event was the first pogrom in history. It is stated that there are no worthy case studies as to what is and isn’t anti-semitism; who all were anti-semitists, and which countries had a strong anti-semitism presence; how much of an impact "pluralism" and "American particularism" had on anti-semitism. For the community it affected, every detail is important no matter how big or small, and each of the components should be explored in-depth before educating others on the history of this prejudice endured by the Jewish. 

What’s the Big Idea?

It is believed there is a long history of improper argumentation and reasoning in regards to anti-semitism. The Jewish people study and measure anti-semitism history, and there are still unanswered questions. For others learning about it, they need to have a basic framework made up of valuable case studies and a detailed history to get a grasp on what anti-semitism was and is really all about. The “central point with respect to anti-semitism: Anti-semitism is not a Jewish problem; it is a non-Jewish problem.”