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Car-Free Communities Not Catching On

August 17, 2011, 10:00 AM
Platform

What's the Latest Development?

When designing the new suburb of King Farm in Rockville, Md., the village planners left a broad swath of green down the main road that sported along its sides a mix of different types of housing and amenities, such as shops, within walking distance. Down the middle of the boulevard they envisaged a rail track that would efficiently link residents with the regional public transit system. The new suburb was dubbed an "exciting" development and what the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cited as an example of smart growth.

What's the Big Idea?

The planned community ticked all the boxes of the new urbanist manifesto: a mix of housing types paired with centrally located amenities, designed for pedestrians and cars as well as public transport–oriented. But instead of embracing that vision, the residents of King Farm and the Rockville City Council recently rejected the proposed transit plan—specifically, any light-rail line that would travel down the swath of green explicitly designed to host such a system. Why?

More from the Big Idea for Thursday, November 08 2012

Today's Big Idea: DIY Urbanism

What is the role of citizen and community input in urban planning? Smart planners aim to empower people in communities in order to ensure the best implementation of a strategy or an idea.  Mean... Read More…

 

Car-Free Communities Not Ca...

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