What's the Latest Development?

Several profiles of Anonymous' supporters have been deleted from Google's new social network, Google+. Like Facebook, Google+ requires that people who wish to set up an account use their real name, a stipulation ill-suited to Anonymous' ideas on privacy and its tendency to break laws. Made famous last year by attacking Visa and PayPal, after the two companies prohibited their patrons from financially supporting WikiLeaks, Anonymous is group of hacker-activists. "The new service, AnonPlus, will be free 'of fear...of censorship...of blackout' and 'for all people, not just Anonymous', according to its creators."

What's the Big Idea?

For better or worse, social media is a numbers game, so does a social network run by Anonymous stand much of a stance against Google and Facebook? No, but that is not Anonymous' goal. Anonymous want to establish a social network where its users can remain—anonymous. It envisions "a dashboard for activists" where ideas can be exchanged and activities coordinated without disclosing legal identities. "The holding page for AnonPlus claims 18 developers will work on the new project. 'This project is not overnight and will take many of those out there who simply want a better Internet,' it says."