What's the Latest Development?

After the Raymond Davis debacle, Osama bin Laden's assassination and continued drone attacks on Pakistani soil, the marriage of convenience between the U.S. and Pakistan has reached a very low point, perhaps the lowest ever. Pakistan's government now talks openly about preferring China over the U.S. when it comes to creating new trade agreements, including constructing oil pipelines, and concerning future military alliances. China, for its part, is so far wary of playing Pakistan's game and doesn't wish to be used as a bargaining chip against American interests in the region. 

What's the Big Idea?

Are we witnessing the beginning of a realignment of power in Asia? Will China's resurgence carve a new diplomatic map in the region? Many experts are hoping so. America's relationship with Pakistan is not healthy and as long as its presence in the region is justified by large stacks of cash, very few true allies of the U.S. are likely to emerge. The New York Times reports today that the draw down of American troops from Afghanistan may be quicker than anticipated, perhaps anticipating a day when the U.S. can build better, longer-lasting ties with New Delhi.