I have already postet these ideas under "Life and Death" but it seems to fit in here very well, because what else is the litmus test for wisdom if not these two little words 'life' and 'death'?

This is an invitation to ask oneself and to discuss with one another. Some of these propositions may seem absurd, but they aren't. One just has to ask the question about the premisses, and the grounding experiences leading to such assertions.   

  1. If I’m living, death is a problem because I’m living.
  2. If death is a problem, I’m living.
  3. Although I’m living, death is a problem.
  4. Although I’m living, death is not a problem.
  5. If death is a problem, I’m lving.
  6. If I’m dead, life is no problem.
  7. Because I’m not living, death is a problem.
  8. Because I’m not living, death is not a problem.
  9. Although I’m not living, death is a problem.
  10. Although I’m not living, death is not problem.
  11. Although death is not a problem, I’m living.
  12. Although I’m not dead, I’m living.
  13. Although I’m living, I’m not dead.
  14.  Although I don’t live, I’m not dead.
  15. Because I'm dead, life is no problem.
Different questions are rising up here:
  1. Which different pictures of / attitudes toward life and death become obvious?
  2. For which kind of people is which proposition/thesis suitable?
  3. What are the consequences of each of these sentences?
  4. What could be the cause of each of them?