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American University Professor Wins AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award

November 15, 2010, 9:24 AM
Larryengel

Larry Engel, a film professor in the School of Communication here at American University, has been awarded the prestigious AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award for his work as Director and Director of Photography for the PBS Human Spark series.  Engel (at left of picture) shares the award in the category of in depth TV reporting with host Alan Alda (at right of picture), producer Graham Chedd, and Executive Producer Jared Lipworth.  From the AAAS news release announcing the award:

This wide-ranging series asked basic questions about what makes us human and how our ancestors evolved with a spark of ingenuity and intelligence that set them apart from other species, including the Neanderthals with which they co-existed for a time. The series looked at what we share in common and what sets us apart from chimpanzees, considered our closest living relatives. And it discussed the latest imaging methods that are giving neuroscientists insights into the brain mechanisms that account for language, one of the most fundamental aspects of the human spark. Dan Vergano, a science writer for USA Today called the winning entry “a sprawling, ambitious look at what makes us human.” Paul Basken, science reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education, called it “well-sourced, well-explained, and full of enthusiasm for the subject.” Series producer Graham Chedd noted that he first came to the United States from Britain nearly 40 years ago as a consultant to AAAS on public engagement with science, a role in which he helped found the NOVA science series on PBS. Since then, he has enjoyed what he called “a wonderful few decades making science shows, with my work with Alan Alda being the most rewarding experience of all. So I have much for which to thank the AAAS, making this award especially meaningful.” The series was produced by Chedd-Angier-Lewis Productions and THIRTEEN, in association with WNET.ORG.

 

 

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