If you're not particularly connected to international political happenings (i.e. you're most Americans), it may come as a surprise that Scottish voters will be answering the big million pound/euro question on September 18:

"Should Scotland be an independent country?"

Here's are the basics:

The major proponents of the "Yes Scotland campaign are current Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond and his Scottish National Party. They argue that independence would unlock bountiful national opportunities and allow the Scottish to take full control over their destiny. Those opposed to independence, campaigning beneath the banner of "Better Together," argue that sticking with the United Kingdom makes the most sense economically, particularly with regard to maintaining use of the British pound.

Take a look at each side's websites for massive amounts of information (and rhetoric) about the upcoming vote. 18 September 2014 will perhaps be the most momentous date in Scotland's history. Beyond that, the ramifications of a "yes" or "no" decision will be felt in both Edinburgh and London, as well as in Wales, Northern Ireland, and other UK territories.

Here are some recent news articles about the referendum:

The New York Times: "Britain Pledges More Self-Rule for Scots if They Reject Scottish Independence"

USA TODAY: "British markets jittery over Scottish independence vote"

The Guardian: "The Guardian view on Scotland's independence referendum"

The Telegraph: "Scottish independence: Yes campaign ahead"

You can also visit the Independence Referendum's fairly well-maintained Wikipedia page for basic background, though be wary of unsourced information.

Finally, if you thought Scotland was already its own independent nation, here's a quick refresher for you via C.G.P. Grey:

Photo credit: Ninian Reid / Flickr